732-528-9199

Kitten Season 2014 is almost here!!!

Kitten Season 2014Meet Lilly. Lilly was adopted from Squan Animal Hospital last year during our kitten season. Kitten season is just around the corner. If you would be interested in opening your home to a furry four legged friend, check back with us in May as we will have cute kittens looking for their forever homes.

 

Squan Animal Hospital LLC
1427 Lakewood Rd
Manasquan, NJ 08736
Phone: 732-528-9199
Fax: 732-528-0769
E-Mail: cs@squananimalhospital.com
Posted in General | No Comments »

Meet Ricky a Dog from Puerto Rico Now Living in Brielle, NJ

Adopted rescue dog now living in Brielle, NJ Meet Ricky!

Ricky is now living the life in Brielle, NJ with his proud new owner. Life hasn’t always been so easy for Ricky. While his new owner was vacationing in Puerto Rico, he was made aware of Ricky, a local dog who was in need of a forever home. All the locals in Puerto Rico helped take care of Ricky, but no one was able to give this sweet boy a long term home.

That’s where PAWS Puerto Rico Animal Welfare Society stepped in. PAWS has basically three missions they try to accomplish. 

1) Cut down on abandoned animals by making spaying/neutering affordable.

2)Adopting out homeless animals and helping strays through adoption or ‘spay and release’ programs

3)Providing education about spaying/neutering

They helped arrange travel plans for Ricky to fly from Puerto Rico to Brielle, NJ and all the locals who were desperate to get Ricky a home also chipped in as much as they could. If you are interested in opening your home to a dog or cat living in Puerto Rico or would like more information on this organization, please visit PAWS website.

 

Squan Animal Hospital LLC

1427 Lakewood Rd

Manasquan, NJ 08736

Phone: 732-528-9199

Fax: 732-528-0769

E-Mail: cs@squananimalhospital.com

Posted in General | No Comments »

Bot Fly Larvae in Dog in Manasquan, NJ

Bot Fly Larvae in dog in Manasquan, NJ

 This is an interesting, although somewhat gross, case of a fly larvae living inside a dogs skin and then popping out to hatch.

Bot Fly beforeSurgical Extraction of fly larvae at Squan Animal HospitalSurgical Extraction of fly larvae at Squan Animal Hospital

There are 34 species of bot fly larvae in North America, their scientific name is Cuterebra. They usually infect rabbits and rodents, although occasionally larvae mistakenly infect dogs and cats. The adult is a fly that looks like a bee, but doesn’t sting. The adult only lives a short time and it’s main goal in life is to lay eggs by rabbit and rodent burrows. The eggs hatch into larvae and are ready to attach to a passing animal to continue their life cycle.

While a dog or cat is rooting around a rabbit or mouse den a larvae can attach to the pet and enter the pet through the nose or mouth. Contrary to popular belief the bot larvae do not burrow through intact skin. The larvae will migrate inside the body and cause one of three syndromes:

  1.  1. Larvae can migrate to the brain, especially in felines, and cause neurological signs like circling, seizures, blindness or behavior changes. This is the typical cause of Feline Ischemic Encephalopathy.

 2. Larvae can migrate in and around the lungs and trachea causing respiratory signs.

 3. Most commonly, larvae eventually migrate to the skin and form a warble, or swelling where the larvae make a breathing hole. (See picture above) The larvae will grow and mature here, then pop out as a maggot 3-6 weeks later to burrow in the soil. In the soil they pupate into an adult fly to continue their life cycle.

Treatment of bots in the skin of pets is simply by extracting them surgically. (See picture above) Oftentimes the opening needs to be made bigger so the larvae can be pulled out intact. If the larvae breaks apart under the skin an allergic reaction can occur. Treatment of larvae in the brain of cats depends on a case by case basis, but usually requires an MRI for diagnosis and a variety of drugs for treatment. Treatment of respiratory cuterebra also involves a variety of drugs.

For more detailed information on Cuterebra in pets see http://www.capcvet.org/capc-recommendations/cuterebriasis

 

Squan Animal Hospital LLC
1427 Lakewood Rd
Manasquan, NJ 08736
Phone: 732-528-9199
Fax: 732-528-0769
E-Mail: cs@squananimalhospital.com
Posted in Animal Illness, General | Comments Off

Snuggles’ Success Story

Snuggles

Hi my name is Snuggles. I am a 13.5 year old pug who was given 6 months to live 2 years ago, today. See I have been fighting for my life for over 5 years now. It started with having been diagnosed with Mast Cell Cancer and Diabetes back in late summer and fall of 2008. Then, 5 months later I developed Cataracts from the diabetes. Mommy opted for cataract surgery immediately and after surgery I developed 4 different types of eye infections that caused me to go fully blind. Two years after the cataract surgery I was told I have Glaucoma in my left eye from the surgery. One month later I got the worst news of all. No matter what mom was doing for me my blood glucose reading was all over the place in a 2 month period so we opted for an X-ray, ultrasound and blood work. Both showed my liver shrunk so tiny and the blood work showed my bile acid numbers were off the charts. The Internist told us I was in Advanced Liver Disfunction. They explained that I was to old for a biopsy to determine the cause and due to the severity I would have a life expectancy of 6 months. There was nothing else they could do for me other then treat individual symptoms as they show themselves. Then, the list grew and 1 year ago they diagnosed me with Chronic Bronchitis. Well, with lots of tender love and care and persistence from my mom and my favorite veterinarians Dr. Levin and holistic vet Dr. Paul, also thanks to amazing holistic and homeopathic remedies and diet change I stand here with you today, 2 years later, cancer free, my diabetes, glaucoma, advanced liver disfunction and chronic bronchitis are all under complete control and I am still fighting strong. Please have faith and bring out the fight in you… It extended my life and yes I am very comfortable!!! Love and Hope everyone.

 

 

 

Posted in Animal Illness, General | Comments Off

Allergy Control for Sonny a Yellow Labrador from Brick, NJ

Allergy Control for Yellow LabradorPictured is Sonny, a 8 year old Yellow Labrador from Brick, New Jersey. Sonny suffers from allergies and is currently using Desensitization Injections to help control his allergies.

 

Allergy Control In Dogs Using Desensitization Injections

This discussion is limited to Atopy and only one specific treatment-desensitization injections to allergens.

Dogs can generally have three classes of allergies:

1) Atopic Dermatitis (Atopy)- These allergies are usually related to environmental allergens that trigger an allergic response by direct contact or inhalation.  These allergens include grasses, pollens, trees, weeds, molds, house dust mites, fabrics and others.  Often times atopy is worse at certain seasons when the specific allergen is prevalent in the environment, but over time can become year round.  Common signs are red, itchy, infected paws, skin and ears. 

2) Food- These allergies are usually related to specific ingredients in food, like certain proteins such as chicken or beef.

3) Insects- These allergies are commonly caused by biting bugs such as fleas, biting mites or flies.

With atopy, after exposure to specific allergens the immune system responds (or over responds) by producing chemicals such as interleukins, histamines, and others that cause skin redness, inflammation and itching, which allows yeast and/or bacteria to cause a secondary infection.  This sets up a vicious cycle of more itching and inflamed skin. 

An intradermal skin test or blood test can check for 50 or more specific allergens common in our area of the country.  Each allergen has a “score” of how allergic it is to the dog.  Those allergens with high scores are combined in a small vial specifically designed for your allergic dog.   Every three weeks you give a very small injection of the allergy solution under the skin of your dog.  By giving frequent injections of small quantities of allergens to your dog it will boost their immune system specifically to those particular allergens.  So then when the dog is naturally exposed to those allergens the immune system will help neutralize them, thus minimizing an outbreak. 

The allergy injections could take 2-6 months or sometimes more to start working.  In general 75% dogs are helped quite a lot by the injections and the dog owners are satisfied they went through with the treatment protocol.  The injections are easy to give and painless for the dog.  We make sure you can administer them properly in the exam room.  For more detailed information click here.

VARL Allergy Serum

 

Environmental allergies like to come back month after month and year after year, which is very frustrating for the dog, owner and veterinarian.  So if you would like to discuss if your allergic dog has atopy and the desensitization injections, just give a call or make an appointment with the veterinarians at Squan Animal Hospital in Wall NJ.

Squan Animal Hospital LLC
1427 Lakewood Rd
Manasquan, NJ 08736
Phone: 732-528-9199
Fax: 732-528-0769
E-Mail: cs@squananimalhospital.com
Posted in Animal Illness, General | Comments Off

Kitten Season Is Here!!!

 

Squan Animal Hospital / Kittens for Adoption / NJKitten Season Is Here. We have four adorable kittens looking for their furever homes.. There are 2 boys and 2 girls. If you are interested in giving one of these kittens a home please stop in and meet them. If you dont fall in love with any of the kittens from this litter, check back weekly as we get new litters in frequently.

Squan Animal Hospital/ Kitten Adoption/ Monmouth County, NJ

Posted in General | Comments Off

Avon, New Jersey Cat Diagnosed with FIV

FIV IN CATS

Avon, New Jersey Cat with FIVPictured is Henry an 8 year old Domestic Shorthair Cat from Avon, New Jersey that has been diagnosed with FIV.

FIV

FIV stands for Feline Immunodeficiency Virus, which only affects cats.  The virus is common worldwide.  It’s highest prevalence is in cats that go outdoors, stray cats, and barn cats, especially in adult male cats and cats that fight/bite each other.   The virus is very short lived outside of the cat.

Mode of Transmission:

The most common way FIV is transmitted is directly through saliva from bite wounds from infected cats.  Less common ways are blood to blood, or from infected queens to their kittens. 

Clinical Signs of Disease:

Following infection most cats have no signs of illness for years.  Many cats with FIV will live a happy healthy life for 5-10 years or more.  Over time the immune system is compromised and doesn’t function as well as it should, predisposing cats to secondary infections.  Signs of FIV infection are varied, but can include:

General lethargy, oral lesions and sores in mouth, eating less, losing weight, fever, large lymph nodes, other infections, lymphoma, as well as many other signs.

Testing:

Most affected cats will test positive on a routine antibody test within two months of exposure.  Occasionally false positive results occur, in which case the cat should be tested again weeks later, or a confirmatory test can be run-like the Western blot test.  Cats vaccinated for FIV will turn up positive on current FIV tests.   Veterinarians are currently working on tests to differentiate a previously vaccinated cat from a truly infected cat.

Vaccine for FIV:

A vaccine commercially exists for FIV, but veterinarians rarely give it because of effectiveness concerns and that vaccinated cats test positive on FIV tests.

Treatment:

Isolation of FIV positive cats in households where cats get along and don’t fight is no longer considered necessary.  If there is a risk of fighting and biting then isolation is best.  Keep the affected cat indoors to minimize chance of virus spread to other cats and to prevent secondary infections in your affected cat.  Drugs that stimulate the immune system generally don’t help but interferon alpha may provide some benefit.  The human HIV drug AZT may help cats showing signs of infection. 

 

More Information:

http://www.veterinarypartner.com/Content.plx?P=A&S=0&C=0&A=1313

http://www.vet.cornell.edu/fhc/brochures/fiv.html

 

If you have an indoor/outdoor cat, call and schedule your appointment today. Please do not hesitate to get in touch! We will make it the best experience possible for you and your four legged friend!

 
Squan Animal Hospital LLC
1427 Lakewood Rd
Manasquan, NJ 08736
Phone: 732-528-9199
Fax: 732-528-0769
E-Mail: cs@squananimalhospital.com
 
 
Posted in Animal Illness, General | Comments Off

Squan Animal Hospital Treats Belmar, NJ Black Labrador with Arthritis

Arthritis in Dogs

Belmar, NJ Black Lab with ArthritisPictured is Kody, a Black Labrador from Belmar, NJ who has arthritis and is doing well with treatment.

What is arthritis?

When we discuss osteo-arthritis (OA) in dogs we usually think about the leg bones and joints-like elbows, shoulders, knees and hips.  The ends of bones in joints are covered with a nice smooth layer of cartilage, that is bathed in a lubricating joint fluid which is surrounded by a joint capsule preventing any leakage.  The bone/cartilage ends mesh and align perfectly.  When the dog walks or runs and the joint moves and bends,  the bones/cartilage slide past each other in a smooth, low friction gliding motion.  A disruption to this normal anatomy and function can lead to inflammation occuring in the joint, changes in the joint fluid lubricating properties, and the cartilage eventually can become roughened and pitted thus losing  it’s nice smooth surface.  Inflammation, cartilage destruction, and pain occur.  As the degenerative condition progresses and gradually gets worse, bony changes can occur which can be detected on x-rays.

Causes of arthritis:

The causes of arthritis are very long and varied. 

1) Developmental  and congenital abnormalities, such as hip dysplasia and elbow dysplasia in large breeds, where the bones don’t perfectly mesh and come together.  Luxating patellas in small breed dogs, where the knee cap is very loose.

2) Immune mediated processes, where the immune system goes awry from a whole variety of reasons and affects or attacks the joint cartilage and joint fluid.  Rheumatoid arthritis is a classical human example of immune mediated erosive arthritis, but less common in dogs.

3) Infectious diseases, such as Lyme disease and other bacteria that can be transmitted by ticks can cause OA.  Other non tick related bacterial infections can affect the joints.   Viral, calicivirus in cats.

4) Aging and/or obesity can put extra strain, stress and wear and tear on the joints thus promoting OA.

5) Injuries, such as a ruptured cruciate ligament in the knee.

6) Other factors.

 

Signs of OA:

Limping, favoring a leg, stiff, sore, slow.

Difficulty or reluctance to stand up.  Difficulty or slow with stairs.

Painful,  behavior changes.

 

Diagnostics, radiographs (X-RAYS):

Physical exam and questioning by the veterinarian, gives valuable information.  As OA advances bone changes can be seen on radiographs. The elbow joint on the left is a normal elbow. The elbow on the right is a severely arthritic dog elbow, with lots of bony spurs and joint swelling.

 Normal Dog Elbow JointOA Elbow Joint in Dog

 

 

 

 

 

       

 

Treatment:

Keep your dog fit and trim and in good body condition.  Low and medium impact exercise like swimming, short jogs and long walks are good for mobility, muscle strength and joint health.  Heavy exercise is excessive and can lead to worsening of OA.  Neutraceuticals like glucosamine, chondroitin and fish oils can help maintain cartilage and joint fluid health.  As OA progresses Non Steroidal Anti-Inflammatory Drugs (NSAIDS) can be added in, aspirin is not very safe for dogs so veterinary types only must be used.  Acupuncture can help with pain and inflammation and keep dogs with OA walking better for a longer time. There are many other meds that can be used, contact your veterinarian for specifics.  Sometimes surgery can be done to slow the progression of arthritis, for example arthroscopic surgery for elbow dysplasia.  Overall the majority of dogs can lead a relatively normal happy life with OA.

 
Come check out our cozy office, get aquainted with our knowledgeable staff and schedule your appointment today, please do not hesitate to get in touch! We will make it the best experience possible for you and your four legged friend!
 
Squan Animal Hospital LLC
1427 Lakewood Rd
Manasquan, NJ 08736
Phone: 732-528-9199
Fax: 732-528-0769
E-Mail: cs@squananimalhospital.com
 

 

 

Posted in Animal Illness, General | Comments Off

Welcome To Squan’ Veterinary Animal Hospital’s Website!

Welcome to Squan’ Veterinary Animal Hospital’s new website!

monmouth county nj dogYou can read more about our veterinary services here  or review our professional profiles here .

We’ve also provided some information on our Veterinary acupuncture services here and there’s lots more – please have a look and do not hesitate to get in touch if you have any questions at all!

Posted in General | Comments Off